Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports
Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports
Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports

Home , Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports

Blog , The Aging Athlete, Sports Competition for Adults Over 40

Data , Data Analysis, Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports

Research , Research on Aging and Fitness for the 40 plus Athlete

Sports , Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports

Buy the Book , Buy the Book: Sports Competition for Adults Over 40: A Participants Guide to 27 Sports

Links , Links and Resources for Adults, Sports Competitors


Canoe & Kayak Racing Magazine
March/April, 2010
Click here to visit the web address
Many articles cited on my "Research" page are available only in a hard copy print format (although this is changing rapidly). Here is a publication available only online with many good articles on training and technique. Although the topics are obviously aimed at canoe and kayak racers, many of the discussions can be applied more broadly to athletes in other sports. In this issue, I particularly recommend:
‚ΔΆ "Ask Coach Caven", page 12, which includes a good discussion of interval training and the importance of rest and recovery for older athletes.
‚ΔΆ "If You Race, Strength Training is Mandatory" by Abel Hastings, page 14, which has good advice on the importance of strength training for endurance athletes.

Orienteering North America
May, 2010 Page 15
"What Happens to Your Lactic Acid After Your Lactic-Stacker Session is Over?"
Owen Anderson
An article on how the body manages the lactic acid accumulated after intensive workouts(i.e. those workout that generate relatively large volumes of lactic acid in the blood stream). According to the article, most of the lactic acid is oxidized into water and CO2. It goes on to point out that this process is optimized by continuing light exercise (e.g. walking or easy cycling) after the workout, rather than stopping completely. Owen Anderson has a website titled "Research Running News" which is included on my Links and Resources page.

Sports Illustrated
May 17, 2010 Page 53
David Epstein
In this article Epstein discusses some of the latest genetic research related to athletic performance, particularly athletic endurance. Now completed, the Human Genome Project has apparently raised many questions about how genes affect athletic performance. The current research does not point to genetics as the only determinant for success in sports. Is there a genetically "perfect" athlete? What are the chances of any one person having all the gene variants that appear to bestow endurance? Alan Williams, a geneticist from the U.K. who has done a great deal of research on the subject, estimates the odds to be about 1 in one quadrillion (1 in 1,000,000,000,000,000). A lively discussion of current research on this topic.

In a related article, see "Working Out in Our Genes" by Gretchen Reynolds in The New York Times Magazine, Sunday May 23, 2010 (page 20) which addresses the question of how genes may affect the urge to exercise. One study of 37,051 sets of twins seeks to determine the contribution of genes, rather than environment, to the willingness/enthusiasm of individuals to exercise.


Back to Articles »


Site by Emerson Web